Personal Finance

Is it time for regulators to set some carbon disclosure ground rules?

Is it time for regulators to set some carbon disclosure ground rules?

Published by Corporate Knights: The Magazine for Clean Capitalism

Fed up with how poorly some companies are disclosing sustainability metrics to regulators, certain investors and reporting advocates are taking matters into their own hands. One retired database developer in Cali­fornia culled through more than 3,800 an­nual reports of publicly traded U.S. com­panies in 2013 and discovered that just 27 per cent of them cited “global warming” or “climate change” in their most recent filing, according to an InsideClimate News report. Julie Gorte...

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The Millionaire Residency Visa

The Millionaire Residency Visa

Published by WSJ.Money Magazine

FOR FOREIGNERS, it used to be that hard work and plenty of patience for bureaucratic red tape would garner access into a coveted country. But, these days, sometimes all it takes to grab that golden ticket is achieving multimillionaire status and promising to make a hefty investment in a new homeland. Countries such as the United States, Australia and New Zealand are all embroiled in a global tug-of-war for the wealthy, and each has either rolled out or reauthorized what are known as millionaire...

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Legalities: A Global Love Affair

Legalities: A Global Love Affair

Published by WSJ.Money Magazine

LOVE HAS NO BORDERS, of course, which may help explain why it's not just the economy that's gone global. To hear estate and tax planners talk, cross-border marriages are skyrocketing—along with a host of international estate and tax-planning headaches. The issues can indeed get thorny: Can an Australian deduct any business expenses in his home country if he and his wife live in Texas? Is a will written in Spain executable by a spouse in Greece? And don't even start on the thicket of prenup issues....

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Heir Aid: Cash-Strapped Entrepreneurs Seek Early Inheritances

Heir Aid: Cash-Strapped Entrepreneurs Seek Early Inheritances

Published by The Wall Street Journal

Lots of entrepreneurs ask their families for money. Scott Harris asked for his inheritance. Two years ago, Mr. Harris couldn't scrape together enough funds to start a business that delivered healthy meals. So, he decided to approach his mother for an early bequest. The money would be coming to him anyway, he figured, and she would be able to see him put the cash to good use. "It was definitely a very long conversation," says the 42-year-old. But his mother eventually agreed—and gave him...

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The Right Way to Bribe Your Children?

The Right Way to Bribe Your Children?

Published by The Wall Street Journal

To bribe, or not to bribe? That is a question parents often grapple with. And most end up giving in. In a survey released in July by coupon site vouchercloud, 55% of parents contacted said they gave their children bribes—including allowances and other forms of compensation—to make them behave or to reward them for certain tasks or achievements. At the same time, however, nearly two-thirds said they would rather give their child less money. Parents aren't the only ones who think they're...

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The Rising Cost of a Midlife Crisis

The Rising Cost of a Midlife Crisis

Published in SmartMoney Magazine and republished in The Wall Street Journal and Yahoo! Finance

NEW YORK CITY// Sudden splurges. Aggressive investments. Risky new businesses. More than 70 million boomers are hitting their middle years. Only for this generation, quitting jobs or squandering money has deeper consequences. Our guide to preventing a blowout. By his own admission, Greg Abel is going through some sort of crisis, of the midlife variety. Until about a year ago, the 46-year-old from Austin, Texas, says, he was just like any other mild-mannered family man he knew, with two kids, a...

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The Best Colleges for Making Money

The Best Colleges for Making Money

Published by SmartMoney: The Wall Street Journal Magazine

NEW YORK CITY// Is an Ivy League education worth the money? The debate over the long-term value of a pricey private-school education is heating up, especially in this tough economy. Sure, everyone knows that by sticker price alone, public schools are a sweet deal, with out-of-state tuition and fees that run about 30 percent less than most of their private rivals and in-state fees running up to three-quarters less. Indeed, the math is pretty jarring; the difference, on average, ranges between...

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